VINYL REVIVAL

All the new documentaries that the BBC are putting out this year many will be on the radio as well as TV and BBC Radio 6 Music will be amongst the BBC radio stations doing their bit.

This is a clip from Radio 6 music talking about vinyl's with Tom Jones and Tom is also on one of the new programmes that is planned by the BBC for 2016 on 1950's and 1960's rock and roll.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01pp2p5
This is a very interesting piece and just over 2 minutes long, well worth a watch and many photos to scroll down to. It is how vinyls are made. My husband found this and thought it would be of interest here.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/36044609/rec...


It is Record Store Day here in the UK, I will visit my vinyl shop later to see what he has on offer. Many are showing their vinyls because of this.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/36058990/you...
Last update on April 16, 8:10 am by Chris.
I went to "Record Store Day" this year for the first time, I have just read in this link that is has been happening since 2007. The vinyl stores I go into are buzzing at the moment. I don't think the record companies can stop the vinyl revolution in this 2nd coming.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/apr/...
It is astonishing how the percentage sold of vinyls jumps from one year to the next 86.5% and how successful "Record Store Day" has become world wide. Vinyls really are making a big comeback. As usual with a Wiki page there is a lot of interesting content here.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinyl_revival
Last update on July 5, 5:41 pm by Chris.
Chris when I talked to the owners of the vinyl stores I go to, they both remarked how much their sales were increasing as well.
Marion
I was reading links to this article before I clicked onto this one so there is much to read about vinyls, they talk of saving the music industry, I do believe it has got people talking about vinyls again and of course buying them. This is just one thing I clicked on there is so much to read about this topic and it is current too.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/james-brinsford/vi...

One link to make you smile:
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/07/08/this-la...
Last update on October 17, 2:32 pm by Chris.
Ha ha ha Chris. The edible record! Who thinks this stuff up? So funny!
Marion
I found this very entertaining to read, not the normal type of article, interesting. Lengthy but I enjoyed it:

https://noisey.vice.com/en_uk/article/the-vinyl-re...
I see you looked at #23 Marion, I know it is a little long but interesting, I hope others got to read it too.

I have something which I forgot to mention, about 3 weeks ago I purchased 45rpm it is a 'Promotion Copy' of Don Everly's "Yesterday Just Passed My Way Again" and "Never Like This" It was done in Britain as a result of DJM's recently signed agreement with Hickory Records. Anita Kerr Singers and Buddy Emmons on steel guitar. There is a lot of writing on the front of this sleeve, yes it is the front this is all on, the back is plain. It was possibly white when new but now it is cream and all the writing is black. I have no idea if it is worth more because it is a 'Promotion Copy' or not. It also says NOT FOR SALE on the sleeve. It is in perfect condition. Wesley Rose Produced it. The vinyl and the sleeve carries a number DJS 10692 which is on the paper centre but also pressed into the 'end of the black' vinyl where the song finishes. If anyone knows if these are worth anymore than a normal single I would love to know.
This is the sleeve and vinyl 45rpm - 'Promotion Copy' of Don's "Never Like This" and "Yesterday Just Passed My Way Again"


RCA film part 1 1956 - how RCA vinyl records were made:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTfNMgrcnZU

Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DdbdLDL7sU
History of vinyl records #1 - the 78rpm single - Manufacturing plant RCA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beMV5wcf0js

Filmed in 1946 this piece takes you behind the scenes at RCA Victor and shows you the manufacturing process that went into the early 78 RPM.


History of vinyl records #2 - the 33 and one third rpm - long play
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjC094yTEj4

This 1956 film showcases the manufacturing of LPs as well as spotlighting the new 12" LP format.


History of vinyl records #3 - The advent of stereo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ywnMhREJRA

This short film made by RCA in 1958 shows the then new "Living Stereo" and the improvement in dynamic range promised to the listener.
Last update on December 11, 6:44 pm by Chris.
Four days ago there was a big vinyl item on BBC Breakfast, it was interesting how far vinyl has yet again had a big push in sales.

Vinyl sales 'at all time high'

3 January 2017 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38503...

Music lovers have been in a spin this year - pushing vinyl sales to the highest they've been in 25 years.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38237...

Radiohead bassist: 'Vinyl is like clothing for music'

7 December 2016

Radiohead's bassist has said vinyl is "a much more pleasurable way of having your music come out".

Colin Greenwood told Radio 4's The World at One the format gives you the chance to "express how you feel about the music in a physical, tangible form."

Vinyl sales made more than downloads last week

Music streaming boosts sales of vinyl

Radiohead dominate producer awards
Some interesting information about vinyls, also see comment #26 and #27

Question: Why are some records thinner than others?

Some seem flimsy, some heavy, and some right in the middle. Older records are very thick. Why are some records thinner than others (cost)? Does this have any thing to do with "grain" (what is grain?) is there any sound difference between thinner and thicker records?

Answer: Cost is the primary, if not only factor. The more vinyl used, the more expensive they are to produce. That said, I think the Munster 220gram pressings are probably over kill. There isn't necessarily a sound difference, but I tend to avoid the really flimsy ones, on the grounds that if they weren't willing to spend the money on using a decent amount of vinyl, there is no telling what other corners were cut.

"Grain" refers to how smooth or rough something sounds. Grainy sound is overly, and inappropriately, rough sound. It refers to poorly recorded/pressed sound and not a rough sounding guitar amp for instance.

Answer: The main reason for heavier records (180-200gm and the like) is that they will, it is claimed, transmit less vibration to the stylus. I don't know how much "real world" difference that makes.
Many of the audiophile reissues also claim that the heavier LPs are less prone to warping. I can't say that is true in my experience.

Answer: And if you cut them too deep on a thin record they will come out the other side, so on thin LPs bass has to be rolled off a lot. Also doing thick one sided LPs it is not required bass be rolled off at all as the cutting stylus can go 3/4 or deeper into the Vinyl.



Record Store day Saturday 22nd April 2017
http://recordstoreday.co.uk/home/
Last update on April 12, 5:08 pm by Chris.
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